Shipbuilding

Shipbuilding_2_Jaring_Het Scheepvaartmuseum Amsterdam

Chinese workers chip paint and rust off a ship’s shell at the dry dock company Amsterdamsche Droogdok Maatschappij, Amsterdam, ca. 1960.
Photo: Cor Jaring/National Maritime Museum Amsterdam.

 

The first vessel was built in Torshavn, FD 442 “Vón” of Fuglsfjørður. The yard in Torshavn was established in 1936. Another yard in Skáli started as a small slipway in 1904 and there were other slipways on the islands founded in the early 20th century. The yard in Skála has slipways, construction hall and the only dry dock on the islands. The yards have delivered steel constructed fishing and freight vessels to the local and the international market. 1939 -40. Photo: Faroe Islands National Heritage, Archives, Library and Museums.

The first vessel was built in Torshavn, FD 442 “Vón” of Fuglsfjørður. The yard in Torshavn was established in 1936. Another yard in Skáli started as a small slipway in 1904 and there were other slipways on the islands founded in the early 20th century. The yard in Skála has slipways, construction hall and the only dry dock on the islands. The yards have delivered steel constructed fishing and freight vessels to the local and the international market. 1939 -40.
Photo: Faroe Islands National Heritage, Archives, Library and Museums.

 

Götaverken shipyard 1940’s. On the early shipyards all boats were unique constructions, their size and design changing from project to project. As shipbuilding became more and more industrialised, production was reorganised. Identical sections of the vessel were manufactured separately and then assembled. Shipyards began to be much like boat factories. Photo: Maritime Museum & Aquarium, Gothenburg.

Götaverken shipyard 1940’s. On the early shipyards all boats were unique constructions, their size and design changing from project to project. As shipbuilding became more and more industrialised, production was reorganised. Identical sections of the vessel were manufactured separately and then assembled. Shipyards began to be much like boat factories. Photo: Maritime Museum & Aquarium, Gothenburg.

 

Most of the fishing fleet in Esbjerg in the 1960s consisted of wooden vessels which to a great extend were built at the shipyards in the port of Esbjerg. Seven local shipyards with hundreds of ship carpenters and workers supplied the fleet with new vessels and took care of maintenance of the wooden vessels, 1960s. Photo: Unknown photographer/Fisheries and Maritime Museum in Esbjerg.

Most of the fishing fleet in Esbjerg in the 1960s consisted of wooden vessels which to a great extend were built at the shipyards in the port of Esbjerg. Seven local shipyards with hundreds of ship carpenters and workers supplied the fleet with new vessels and took care of maintenance of the wooden vessels, 1960s. Photo: Unknown photographer/Fisheries and Maritime Museum in Esbjerg.

 

Building of the train-ferry Nord-Pas de Calais.The train-ferry Nord-Pas de Calais was the last ship launched at the Dunkirk one-hundred year old ship-building yard Ateliers et Chantiers de France before it closed. 1987. Photo: Ateliers et Chantiers de France/Collection Musée portuaire Dunkerque.

Building of the train-ferry Nord-Pas de Calais.The train-ferry Nord-Pas de Calais was the last ship launched at the Dunkirk one-hundred year old ship-building yard Ateliers et Chantiers de France before it closed. 1987.
Photo: Ateliers et Chantiers de France/Collection Musée portuaire Dunkerque.

A Female Riveter at Hall Russell’s shipyard, Aberdeen c.1940. During the Second World War women were called upon to take on traditionally male roles and work, including shipbuilding.

A Female Riveter at Hall Russell’s shipyard, Aberdeen c.1940.
During the Second World War women were called upon to take on traditionally male roles and work, including shipbuilding.
The Americans created a popular propaganda figure called ‘Rosie the Riveter’ whose slogan was, ‘We Can Do It!’ – this image from Aberdeen’s shipyards shows a more reticent women taking on this important war work.
Photo: A. K Lennox/ Aberdeen Art Gallery & Museums Collections. 

A riveter of the dry dock company Amsterdamsche Droogdok Maatschappij, 1958. Photo: Cor Jaring/National Maritime Museum Amsterdam.

A riveter of the dry dock company Amsterdamsche Droogdok Maatschappij, 1958.
Photo: Cor Jaring/National Maritime Museum Amsterdam.

Crane view over the industrialised northern river shore from Eriksberg shipyard late 1960’s. The shipyard is gone but the crane is kept in the newly built housing area as a reminder of the industrial past. In the 1980’s and 90’s it was used for bungy-jumping. Photo: Maritime Museum & Aquarium, Gothenburg.

Crane view over the industrialised northern river shore from Eriksberg shipyard late 1960’s. The shipyard is gone but the crane is kept in the newly built housing area as a reminder of the industrial past. In the 1980’s and 90’s it was used for bungy-jumping. Photo: Maritime Museum & Aquarium, Gothenburg.